Evacuees console one another in Tokyo's Shinjuku Central Park on March 11 after the magnitude 8.9 earthquake in Japan.
Although miles from the epicenter, Tokyo felt the effects of the earthquake and its aftershocks as buildings swayed, train cars rocked, and windows rattled, according to BBC News. Residents and office workers poured out of buildings in Japan’s capital city and gathered in open spaces. (Related: "Earthquake Fault Under Tokyo Closer Than Expected, Study Finds.")
The earthquake prompted officials to suspend Tokyo’s rapid transit system, stranding many people in the city center, the BBC reported. About four million homes in the Tokyo area are without power.
On March 17, 2011 at 7:47am

Evacuees console one another in Tokyo's Shinjuku Central Park on March 11 after the magnitude 8.9 earthquake in Japan.

Although miles from the epicenter, Tokyo felt the effects of the earthquake and its aftershocks as buildings swayed, train cars rocked, and windows rattled, according to BBC News. Residents and office workers poured out of buildings in Japan’s capital city and gathered in open spaces. (Related: "Earthquake Fault Under Tokyo Closer Than Expected, Study Finds.")

The earthquake prompted officials to suspend Tokyo’s rapid transit system, stranding many people in the city center, the BBC reported. About four million homes in the Tokyo area are without power.

Hang En Cave


 
Going underground, expedition members enter Hang En, a cave tunneled out by the Rao Thuong River. Dwindling to a series of ponds during the dry months, the river can rise almost 300 feet (91 meters) during the flood season, covering the rocks where cavers stand.
On March 8, 2011 at 5:21pm

Hang En Cave

Going underground, expedition members enter Hang En, a cave tunneled out by the Rao Thuong River. Dwindling to a series of ponds during the dry months, the river can rise almost 300 feet (91 meters) during the flood season, covering the rocks where cavers stand.


Up-Inspired Floating House
Yesterday morning, March 5, at dawn, National Geographic Channel and a team of scientists, engineers, and two world-class balloon pilots successfully launched a 16’ X 16’ house 18’ tall with 300 8’ colored weather balloons from a private airfield east of Los Angeles, and set a new world record for the largest balloon cluster flight ever attempted. The entire experimental aircraft was more than 10 stories high, reached an altitude of over 10,000 feet, and flew for approximately one hour.
On March 8, 2011 at 3:27am

Up-Inspired Floating House

Yesterday morning, March 5, at dawn, National Geographic Channel and a team of scientists, engineers, and two world-class balloon pilots successfully launched a 16’ X 16’ house 18’ tall with 300 8’ colored weather balloons from a private airfield east of Los Angeles, and set a new world record for the largest balloon cluster flight ever attempted. The entire experimental aircraft was more than 10 stories high, reached an altitude of over 10,000 feet, and flew for approximately one hour.

(Source: aclockworkorange)

Discovery’s Approach


Docked with the International Space Station, a Russian Progress spacecraft seems to take aim at the space shuttleDiscovery as the shuttle approaches the ISS, as seen in an astronaut picture taken last Saturday.
Discovery docked with the station at 2:14 p.m. ET that day. Discovery’s crew is spending 11 days at the station to deliver supplies and help install new modules.
On March 8, 2011 at 3:19am

Discovery’s Approach

Docked with the International Space Station, a Russian Progress spacecraft seems to take aim at the space shuttleDiscovery as the shuttle approaches the ISS, as seen in an astronaut picture taken last Saturday.

Discovery docked with the station at 2:14 p.m. ET that day. Discovery’s crew is spending 11 days at the station to deliver supplies and help install new modules.

Black Hole Off Switch


Some supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies seem to have voracious appetites, gobbling up material so fast that some of it escapes as jets of radiation. But others, including the black hole at the heart of our own Milky Way, are oddly dormant.
According to new research, published March 10 in the Astrophysical Journal, hungry black holes also generate wider swaths of radiation that drive strong winds of gas. As illustrated above, these winds push material out of reach, until there’s nothing near enough to fall into the black hole’s grasp. Starved, the black hole goes dormant.
On March 8, 2011 at 3:18am

Black Hole Off Switch

Some supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies seem to have voracious appetites, gobbling up material so fast that some of it escapes as jets of radiation. But others, including the black hole at the heart of our own Milky Way, are oddly dormant.

According to new research, published March 10 in the Astrophysical Journal, hungry black holes also generate wider swaths of radiation that drive strong winds of gas. As illustrated above, these winds push material out of reach, until there’s nothing near enough to fall into the black hole’s grasp. Starved, the black hole goes dormant.

Balancing Act


The cratered face of Saturn’s moon Rhea (top) looms large over the wispy moon Dione, which seems to balance on the planet’s thin rings, in a newly released picture from NASA’s Cassini orbiter. The rings were actually closer to the spacecraft than Dione was at the time.
Cassini has been touring the Saturnian system since 2004, studying the giant planet, its rings, and its many moons. The long-lived probe is currently in the second extension of its mission, which will run through September 2017.
On March 8, 2011 at 3:17am

Balancing Act

The cratered face of Saturn’s moon Rhea (top) looms large over the wispy moon Dione, which seems to balance on the planet’s thin rings, in a newly released picture from NASA’s Cassini orbiter. The rings were actually closer to the spacecraft than Dione was at the time.

Cassini has been touring the Saturnian system since 2004, studying the giant planet, its rings, and its many moons. The long-lived probe is currently in the second extension of its mission, which will run through September 2017.

Rosy Sunflower

The Sunflower galaxy is pretty in pink in a new infrared picture from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope released March 3.
Also called M63, the Sunflower is a spiral galaxy about 37 million light-years away. Spitzer’s infrared eye allows astronomers to trace the dusty structures in the galaxy’s spiral arms and see where new stars are being born.
On March 8, 2011 at 3:16am

Rosy Sunflower

The Sunflower galaxy is pretty in pink in a new infrared picture from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope released March 3.

Also called M63, the Sunflower is a spiral galaxy about 37 million light-years away. Spitzer’s infrared eye allows astronomers to trace the dusty structures in the galaxy’s spiral arms and see where new stars are being born.